Dahl



Dal (also spelled Dahl or Daal, or Dhal) is a preparation of pulses (dried lentils, peas or beans) which have been stripped of their outer hulls and split. It also refers to the thick stew prepared from these, an important part of Indian, Nepali, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is regularly eaten with rice and vegetables in Southern India, and with both rice and roti (wheat-based flat bread) throughout Northern India and Pakistan. Dal is a ready source of proteins for a balanced diet containing little or no meat.

Common varieties :
Chana dal = gram dal : Chana dal is produced by removing the outer layer of Kala chana (black chickpeas) and then splitting the kernel.
Kala Chana dal = Bengal gram : Dal of small Chickpeas with brown skins. In the US and Canada it is known as Desi Chickpea.
Kabuli dal : Dal of split Kabuli chickpeas. Known for its black coat, it is an average size chickpea.
Yellow split dal : Dal of yellow split peas.
Masoor dal = Masar dal : Dal of red lentils.
Mung dal :Dal of Mung beans.
Mussyang : Mussyang dal. Dals of various colours that are found in various hilly regions of Nepal.
Toor dal =Tuvar dal = Arhar dal : Dal of yellow pigeon peas.
Val val dal : Dal of split lablab beans
Chowli dal : Dal of black eye pea.
Oerdie / Urad dal = Black gram :Dal of Urad beans (=black gram beans). =Kali dal

Urad dal skinned and split =white lentils= skinned and split black lentils.

Urad dal split = Split black lentils = Chilke Urad

Lentil (dahl) :

The lentil (Lens culinaris) is a type of pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 15 inches (38 cm) tall and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each A variety of pulses or lentils exist with colours that range from yellow to red-orange to green, brown and black. Red, white and yellow lentils in some cases are peeled, i.e., are those that have their skins removed before being sold. There are large and small varieties of many lentils (e.g., Masoor Lentils, shown in photos here). Lentils are sold in many forms, with or without the skins, whole or split.

Culturally, other pulses are sometimes called lentils but are actually beans or peas, e.g. “black lentils” (urad beans).

Culinary use:
Lentils were the main ingredient in food of ancient Iranians. Iranians consumed lentils daily in form of stew that was poured over rice. Lentils are used throughout South Asia, the Mediterranean regions and the Middle East. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. Lentils contain high levels of proteins, including the essential amino acids isoleucine and lysine, and are an essential source of inexpensive protein in many parts of the world for those who adhere to a vegetarian diet.

Types:

  • Brown/Spanish Pardina
  • French Green/Puy lentils (Dark speckled blue-green)
  • Green
  • Black/Beluga
  • Yellow/Tan Lentils (Red inside)
  • Red Chief (Decorticated yellow lentils)
  • Eston Green (Small green)
  • Richlea (Medium green)
  • Laird (Large green)
  • Petite Golden (Decorticated lentils)
  • Masoor (Brown-skinned lentils which are red inside)
  • Petite Crimson/Red (Decorticated masoor lentils)
  • Macchiato (Big Mexican yellow lentils)

Flavour :

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